3 February 2009

Gordon Brown: 'British Jobs for British Workers'


"(...) when people are also asked what they admire about Britain, more usually says it is our values: - British tolerance, the British belief in liberty and the British sense of fair play (...)Indeed Britain is a country that not only prides itself in its fairness, tolerance and what George Orwell called decency but wants to be defined by it, defined by being a tolerant, fair and decent country " - Gordon Brown's Speech on on Britishness, February 2007


"As we set out on the next stage of our journey, this is our vision: Britain leading the global economy – by our skills and creativity, by our enterprise and flexibility, by our investment in transport and infrastructure – a world leader in science, a world leader in financial and business services, a world leader in energy and the environment, from nuclear to renewables, a world leader in the creative industries, and, yes, modern manufacturing, too – drawing on the talents of all to create British jobs for British workers." - Gordon Brown First Speech first speech to the Labour party conference as leader, on 24 September 2007








For a better Understanding read in Chronological order

Gordon Brown's speech in full
I am proud to be British.I believe in British values. And the values I was brought up with are not just what I learned; they are part of the fabric of the life I have led.

Leaders clash over commitment to substance in Commons battle
The Tory leader also accused the prime minister of borrowing the slogan "British jobs for British workers" from the National Front and BNP - throwing down far-right leaflets which used the phrase and taunting him with the question: "Where's your moral compass now?"

Gordon Brown's 'British jobs' pledge has caused controversy before
Gordon Brown's controversial pledge to "create British jobs for British workers" created a furore when he made it, with opponents branding it meaningless, racist and even illegal under EU law.

Brown stands by British jobs for British workers remark

Gordon Brown has no regrets over using the phrase "British jobs for British workers", Downing Street insisted today as a series of unofficial strikes broke out over UK construction jobs awarded to European workers.

This is a race to the bottom
The wave of strikes across the country should come as no surprise. Popular anger is overcoming complacency and fear.

Unions: Labour was warned about jobs for foreigners
Field wants a new law to compel companies operating in the UK to offer contracts to domestic workers first. "We have got to get ahead of this debate rather than react to it," Field said. "Unless we do, we are supplying oxygen to the BNP."

We once welcomed workers from all over the Empire
Between 1966 and 2005, a net 2.6 million British nationals left the country to live abroad, two-thirds of them to seek work, according to research by the Institute for Public Policy Research. In other words, an average of more than 65,000 British workers left than arrived, every year.

There is a European solution to this made-in-Europe problem

The simmering nationalist tensions stoked up by the Daily Mail's campaign against Polish workers or the vulgar anti-European xenophobia of William Hague and cohorts among Tory and Ukip MPs has now come to life, as construction workers demonstrate against a handful of Italian workers on the cold Humber coastline.

5 comments:

  1. Joanna
    What a disappointment that your blog which was so focused on the injustice done to Madeleine McCann and your own police inspector by both the Portuguese and British authorities, should now become so xenophobic in fostering an anti British campaign the content of which does not do justice to your usually unbiased reporting.
    Shame on you to pad out your blog with such rubbish.
    Most of us British people are fully aware that our Prime Minister is a fool, we do not need you to tell us that and promote anti British feelings in your blog.
    Roy

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  2. The problem with Britain (and present day Portugal too) is that it had to welcome foreign workers in, to do the lowsy, dirty, low-paid jobs the british would not do!In the days of a more healthy economy they were a very needed commodity, necessary to keep the country going, because the locals found it far more appealing and easy to live on handouts from social security, the "chavs" wouldn't dirty themselves with such jobs, when social benefits pay more and leave you plenty of time to stay home drinking beer in front of the telly!
    This would all be solved if the foreign workers entering Britain or Portugal would have to be paid and have the same benefits as the locals. Out of need, those workers will accept lower wages and poor living conditions, and the employers are only too willing to take advantage of this need.

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  3. This takes the cake, really! Accusations of a xenophobic campaign against the british...one can't help laughing! Britain, one of the most xenophobic nations on the face of the hearth, accusing others of anti-british feelings.Have you forgotten how you behaved towards the people fom the countries you took over? India, Ireland, Australia( do you remember how the aborigine children were taken from their families to be brought up the "british way", and that the aborigine people were included in the cathegory of fauna and flora until the 60's? They were not even considered human beings!)
    Look at the history of the british empire and your behaviour towards the natives of those lands before accusing others of xenophobia!

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  4. It’s interesting how many British people get so easily offended when the unflattering actions of one of their citizens is brought to light even when they know what has been written is the truth. Just imagine if one of your law abiding hard working citizens is described as a lazy incompetent drunk, or if you are living abroad and you turn on your television set and someone is ridiculing your country for trying to find out the truth. How would you feel then?

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  5. Hello everyone!
    I understand that this article shows the hipocracy of Gordon Brown, rather then take sides in "polish plumer problem", which was first raised as acompaign by French. And French as many other EU countries prevented that problem.
    Britain, Ireland and Sweeden alone opened their doors.
    Use of foreign workers has nothing to do with democracy( which if one believes the term is a internal state organisation). Use of foreign workers is a foreign policy decision. It is not healthy for economy of the country (both countries involved). It shows either deep crisis of the counrty economy(Germany after the war),speculative caracter of economy, when well off coutries cant support economy based on expencive labour and searching for cheep one( western world nowdays) or political interests . In "polish problem" was caused by political reasons - guess which?
    But hypocracy is a moto in English politics.
    Irina.

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